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Rapid Microscope Based Identification Method for Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacteria:: Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) - Current State of The Art and Future Research Needs
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
2016 (English)In: Tuberculosis, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major increasing causes of illness and death worldwide, especially in Asia and Africa. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of mycobacteria is important in the prevention and effective treatment of tuberculosis. Today, conventional culture methods are still accepted as the gold standard for the identification of mycobacteria in routine mycobacteriology laboratories. However, even if these methods are highly efficient and useful, these methods are time-consuming and labor-laborious. In recent years, several novel DNA-based and non-invasive techniques, such as RAMAN spectroscopy and microcalorimetry have been developed for a more rapid and reliable identification. Unfortunately, these methods are not capable of visualizing the cells in their natural environment such as in tissues. Visualization of cells may however provide fundamental, complementary information for the overall understanding of the molecular and microbial ecology of mycobacteria in disease processes. Here, we present a current state of the art review of the Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) methods which can be used to identify, visualize and quantify whole cells of different species of mycobacteria, especially the tuberculosis complex, and their associates in their natural environment without prior cultivation. Although this method also allows for an easy, rapid and cost-efficient identification (~1-3 hours) 2Tuberculosis | www.smgebooks.comCopyright  Borekci G.This book chapter is open access distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which allows users to download, copy and build upon published articles even for commercial purposes, as long as the author and publisher are properly credited. and simultaneous in situ visualization of different microbial species, it has so far only been used to a limited extent. Here, we will discuss both the potentials as well as limitations of FISH for the detection of mycobacteria and other relevant associates, and suggest some future research needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
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URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128714OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-128714DiVA, id: diva2:1055711
Available from: 2016-12-13 Created: 2016-12-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09

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Lee, Natuschka M.

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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More languages
Output format
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