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Nematode community resistant to deep soil frost in boreal forest soils
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. (Arcum)
2016 (English)In: Pedobiologia, ISSN 0031-4056, E-ISSN 1873-1511, Vol. 59, no 5-6, 243-251 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As global climate change advances, shifts in winter precipitation are becoming more common in high latitude ecosystems, resulting in less insulating snow cover and deeper soil frost. Long-term alterations to soil frost can impact on ecosystem processes such as decomposition, microbial activity and vegetation dynamics. In this study we utilized the longest running, well-characterized soil frost manipulation experiment in a boreal forest. We measured nematode family composition and feeding group abundances at four different soil layer depths from plots that had been subjected to deep soil frost for one and 11 years. The overall abundance of nematodes and the different feeding groups were unaffected by deep soil frost. However, a higher Maturity Index was weakly associated with deep soil frost (indicative of lower nutrient enrichment and more persister nematode (i.e., K-strategist) families), likely due to the loss of nutrients and reduced inputs from inhibited decomposition. Multivariate and regression analyses showed that most nematode families were weakly associated with dominant understory plant species and strongly associated with soil organic matter (SOM). This is probably the result of higher resource availability in the control plots, which is favorable to the nematode community. These results indicate that the nematode community was more strongly driven by the long-term indirect effects of deep soil frost on SOM as opposed to the direct effects. Our findings highlight that the indirect effects of altered winter precipitation and soil frost patterns may be more important than direct winter climate effects. Further, such indirect effects on SOM and the plant community that may affect the nematode community can only be seen in long-term experiments. Finally, given the critical role nematodes play in soil food webs and carbon and nutrient cycling, our results demonstrate the necessity of considering the response of nematodes to global climate change in boreal forest soils. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 59, no 5-6, 243-251 p.
Keyword [en]
Boreal forest, Global climate change, Nematodes, Riparian zone, Soil frost
National Category
Soil Science Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130010DOI: 10.1016/j.pedobi.2016.10.001ISI: 000389113800002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-130010DiVA: diva2:1063812
Available from: 2017-01-11 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2017-01-12Bibliographically approved

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Blume-Werry, Gesche
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
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