umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Visual-spatial ability is more important than motivation for novices in surgical simulator training: a preliminary study
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Medical Education, ISSN 2042-6372, E-ISSN 2042-6372, Vol. 7, 56-61 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To investigate whether surgical simulation performance and previous video gaming experience would correlate with higher motivation to further train a specific simulator task and whether visual-spatial ability would rank higher in importance to surgical performance than the above. It was also examined whether or not motivation would correlate with a preference to choose a surgical specialty in the future and if simulator training would increase the interest in choosing that same work field. Methods: Motivation and general interest in surgery was measured pre- and post-training in 30 medical students at Karolinska Institutet who were tested in a laparoscopic surgical simulator in parallel with measurement of visual-spatial ability and self-estimated video gaming experience. Correlations between simulator performance metrics, visual-spatial ability and motivation were statistically analyzed using regression analysis. Results: A good result in the first simulator trial correlated with higher self-determination index (r = -0.46, p=0.05) in male students. Visual-spatial ability was the most important underlying factor followed by intrinsic motivation score and finally video gaming experience (p=0.02, p=0.05, p=0.11) regarding simulator performance in male students. Simulator training increased interest in surgery when studying all subjects (p=0.01), male subjects (p=0.02) as well as subjects with low video gaming experience (p=0.02). Conclusions: This preliminary study highlights individual differences regarding the effect of simulator training on motivation that can be taken into account when designing simulator training curricula, although the sample size is quite small and findings should be interpreted carefully.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 7, 56-61 p.
Keyword [en]
Motivation, video games, surgical simulator, surgical training, visual-spatial ability
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129998DOI: 10.5116/ijme.56b1.1691ISI: 000386885200001PubMedID: 26897701OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-129998DiVA: diva2:1064584
Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2017-01-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(237 kB)7 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 237 kBChecksum SHA-512
b3e33af7a4605cd1ac85ab5c40f72f8476176339f3eeef3d874d08cb11d0d0bccaeef722ed6fedcac3e2b39a1b387c18f39f19779c0674b8a0eb8fc9b902b2ff
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hedman, Leif
By organisation
Department of Psychology
In the same journal
International Journal of Medical Education
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 7 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 16 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf