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Home alone: the effects of isolation on uptake of a pharmaceutical contaminant in a social fish
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
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2016 (English)In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 180, 71-77 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A wide range of biologically active pharmaceutical residues is present in aquatic systems worldwide. As uptake potential and the risk of effects in aquatic wildlife are directly coupled, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between stress by isolation, uptake and effects of the psychiatric pharmaceutical oxazepam in fish. To do this, we measured cortisol levels, behavioral stress responses, and oxazepam uptake under different stress and social conditions, in juvenile perch (Percafluviatilis) that were either exposed (1.03 mu gl(-1)) or not exposed to oxazepam. We found single exposed individuals to take up more oxazepam than individuals exposed in groups, likely as a result of stress caused by isolation. Furthermore, the bioconcentration factor (BCF) was significantly negatively correlated with fish weight in both social treatments. We found no effect of oxazepam exposure on body cortisol concentration or behavioral stress response. Most laboratory experiments, including standardized bioconcentration assays, are designed to minimize stress for the test organisms, however wild animals experience stress naturally. Hence, differences in stress levels between laboratory and natural environments can be one of the reasons why predictions from artificial laboratory experiments largely underestimate uptake of oxazepam, and other pharmaceuticals, in the wild.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016. Vol. 180, 71-77 p.
Keyword [en]
Bioconcentration, Brain concentration, Isolation, Pharmaceutical pollution, Shoaling, Stress mediated take
National Category
Ecology Oceanography, Hydrology, Water Resources Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130107DOI: 10.1016/j.aquatox.2016.09.004ISI: 000388777600007PubMedID: 27658223OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-130107DiVA: diva2:1064829
Available from: 2017-01-13 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2017-01-13Bibliographically approved

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Heynen, MartinaFick, JerkerJonsson, MicaelKlaminder, JonatanBrodin, Tomas
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
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  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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