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Self-reported pregnancy-related health problems and self-rated health status in Rwandan women postpartum: a population-based cross-sectional study
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. University of Rwanda College of Medicine and Health Sciences School of Public Health, Kigali, Rwanda.
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2016 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 16, 340Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Self-rated health status (SRH) can be used as a predictor of morbidity and mortality. Postpartum self-rated health has been used to estimate maternal morbidity and postpartum problems. Reproductive history factors are associated with poor self-rated health postpartum. This study investigated prevalence of self-reported health problems during first, second, and third trimesters of pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum. In addition, this study investigated SRH in Rwandan women up to 13 months from partus. Methods: This population-based, cross-sectional study collected data in 2014 using structured interviews (N = 921). Univariable analysis was used to identify variables that were associated with poor self-rated health status (poor-SRH). Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with poor-SRH at one day, one week, and one month postpartum and at the time of the interview. Results: Mean time between latest delivery and the time of interview was 7.1 months. Prevalence of anaemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus during pregnancy, and severe bleeding during pregnancy and labour were 15.0, 4.9, 2.4, and 3.7 %, respectively. The prevalence of poor-SRH was 32.2 % at one day postpartum, 7.8 % at one month, and 11.7 % at time of the interview. Hypertension during pregnancy and significant postpartum haemorrhage were associated with poor-SRH at one day and one week postpartum. Severe bleeding during pregnancy and labour were associated with poor-SRH at one week and one month postpartum. Infection and anaemia during pregnancy were associated with poor-SRH at one month postpartum and at the time of interview. The Kaplan-Meier curves illustrate restitution of health for most women during the study period. Conclusions: This population-based study reports a high prevalence of poor SRH status among Rwandan women in the early postpartum period. Identified factors associated with poor-SRH were severe bleeding, hypertension, infection, and anaemia during pregnancy and postpartum haemorrhage. These factors may be prevented or reduced by providing more frequent and specific attention during pregnancy and by providing timely measures that address complications during delivery, including adequate postpartum care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 16, 340
Keyword [en]
Self-rated health status, Pregnancy, Rwanda, Reproductive history, Cross-sectional study, Pregnancy-related complications
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129839DOI: 10.1186/s12884-016-1138-yISI: 000387606600001PubMedID: 27821082OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-129839DiVA: diva2:1065397
Available from: 2017-01-16 Created: 2017-01-09 Last updated: 2017-01-16Bibliographically approved

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Semasaka, Jean Paul S.Edvardsson, KristinaMogren, Ingrid
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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