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Climatic niche divergence or conservatism?: Environmental niches and range limits in ecologically similar damselflies
Evolutionary Ecology Unit, Department of Biology, Ecology Building, Lund University, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7089-524X
2012 (English)In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 93, no 6, 1353-1366 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The factors that determine species' range limits are of central interest to biologists. One particularly interesting group comprises odonates (dragonflies and damselflies), which show large differences in secondary sexual traits and respond quickly to climatic factors, but often have minor interspecific niche differences, challenging models of niche-based species coexistence. We quantified the environmental niches at two geographic scales to understand the ecological causes of northern range limits and the coexistence of two congeneric damselflies (Calopteryx splendens and C. virgo). Using environmental niche modeling, we quantified niche divergence first across the whole geographic range in Fennoscandia, and second only in the sympatric part of this range. We found evidence for interspecific divergence along the environmental axes of temperature and precipitation across the northern range in Fennoscandia, suggesting that adaptation to colder and wetter climate might have allowed C. virgo to expand farther north than C. splendens. However, in the sympatric zone in southern Fennoscandia we found only negligible and nonsignificant niche differences. Minor niche differences in sympatry lead to frequent encounters and intense interspecific sexual interactions at the local scale of populations. Nevertheless, niche differences across Fennoscandia suggest that species differences in physiological tolerances limit range expansions northward, and that current and future climate could have large effects on the distributional ranges of these and ecologically similar insects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 93, no 6, 1353-1366 p.
Keyword [en]
Biogeography, Calopteryx splendens, Calopteryx virgo, climate, ecological speciation, ectotherms, niche divergence, nonecological speciation, sexual selection, thermal adaptation
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130370DOI: 10.1890/11-1181.1ISI: 000305296600013Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84862297478OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-130370DiVA: diva2:1066542
Available from: 2017-01-18 Created: 2017-01-18 Last updated: 2017-02-02Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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