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Collegiality, therapy and mediation: the contribution of experts in Swedish mental health law
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4540-5373
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
2017 (English)In: Laws, ISSN 0458-7251, E-ISSN 2268-1167, Vol. 6, no 1, 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Independent experts serve a vital role in how the human rights of patients are protected in mental health law. This article investigates the contribution of court-appointed psychiatrists (APs) in civil commitment court hearings. Analysis is based on 12 court hearings that were audiotaped. Supplementary informal interviews with participants were also conducted. Data were analysed through a combination of rhetoric analysis and discourse analysis. Analysis of the hearings reveals that APs do not fulfil their function to critically investigate treating psychiatrists’ (CPs) recommendations that patients meet commitment criteria. They typically do not ask any questions from CPs, and the few questions that are asked do not cast light on the legal issues at stake. To further understand the role of APs, their communication has been analyzed in terms of four interpretative repertoires: collegial, disclosing, therapeutic and mediating. In conclusion, the human rights of patients subjected to involuntary commitment might be at risk when therapeutic concerns are built into the process. The specific Swedish model where APs deliver their own assessment about whether commitment criteria are met may be counterproductive. This argument possibly extends to the role of medical members in mental health tribunals in the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 6, no 1, 2
Keyword [en]
experts, court hearings, compulsory psychiatric care, civil commitment, mentla health law, human rights, therapeutic jurisprudence, non-adversarial law, interpretative repertoires
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130565DOI: 10.3390/laws6010002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-130565DiVA: diva2:1067945
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Note

This article belongs to the Special Issue The Intersection of Human Rights Law and Health Law

Available from: 2017-01-23 Created: 2017-01-23 Last updated: 2017-03-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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