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Subjective and Objective Side-effects during Treatment with Oral Appliances
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
2016 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Objectively measured changes in dental occlusion after long-term treatment with oral appliances (OAs) for sleep apnea are known to occur. Our hypothesis was that most patients are unaware of these changes, since they continue treatment for many years. This study aim was to evaluate the relationship between objectively measured bite changes and subjective complaints in a group of long-term treated patients. Seventeen consecutive patients were included in this retrospective observational pilot study. The patients responded to two questionnaires about adherence and side-effects. The first questionnaire (q-unspec) included unspecified questions and the second questionnaire (q-spec) comprised specified questions about well-known side-effects using VAS-scales. Measurements were conducted on plaster casts taken before treatment start and at follow-up regarding changes in overjet, overbite, crowding and spacing during the treatment period. A change of ≥ 1 mm in either of these variables was compared with patients’ reports of ≥ 2 on the VAS-scale. Significant objective bite changes were found only in overjet and in overbite. Two patients reported bite changes in the q-unspec, although none of them had any objective change. Nine of the remaining 15 patients had objective bite changes although only one had felt a bite change according to q-spec. There was no correlation between a decrease in overjet or overbite and the patients’ complaints. The results support our hypothesis that patients are generally uninfluenced by changes in dental occlusion. Patients who are treated with OAs should therefore continuously be followed up regarding bite changes, in order to avoid possible future problems.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131253OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-131253DiVA: diva2:1073145
External cooperation
VLL
Educational program
Dentistry Programme
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-02-09 Created: 2017-02-09 Last updated: 2017-02-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf