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An intelligent rollator for mobility impaired persons, especially stroke patients
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science. University Hospital of Northern Sweden and Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå, Sweden.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. University Hospital of Northern Sweden and Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå, Sweden.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. University Hospital of Northern Sweden and Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå, Sweden.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. University Hospital of Northern Sweden and Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå, Sweden.
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, ISSN 0309-1902, E-ISSN 1464-522X, Vol. 40, no 5, 270-279 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An intelligent rollator (IRO) was developed that aims at obstacle detection and guidance to avoid collisions and accidental falls. The IRO is a retrofit four-wheeled rollator with an embedded computer, two solenoid brakes, rotation sensors on the wheels and IR-distance sensors. The value reported by each distance sensor was compared in the computer to a nominal distance. Deviations indicated a present obstacle and caused activation of one of the brakes in order to influence the direction of motion to avoid the obstacle. The IRO was tested by seven healthy subjects with simulated restricted and blurred sight and five stroke subjects on a standardised indoor track with obstacles. All tested subjects walked faster with intelligence deactivated. Three out of five stroke patients experienced more detected obstacles with intelligence activated. This suggests enhanced safety during walking with IRO. Further studies are required to explore the full value of the IRO.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 40, no 5, 270-279 p.
Keyword [en]
Assistive technology, intelligent walker, stroke
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131356DOI: 10.3109/03091902.2016.1167973PubMedID: 27078084OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-131356DiVA: diva2:1073759
Available from: 2017-02-13 Created: 2017-02-13 Last updated: 2017-03-21Bibliographically approved

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Hellström, ThomasLindahl, OlofBäcklund, TomasKarlsson, MarcusHohnloser, PeterBråndal, AnnaHu, XiaoleiWester, Per
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Department of Computing ScienceDepartment of Radiation SciencesDepartment of Public Health and Clinical MedicineMedicine
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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