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A Multi-Level Study of Income Inequality and Self-Rated Health in Northern Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
2016 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background: Income inequality has been increasing in Sweden over the last 20 years. The

effects of income inequality on health especially in the Northern Sweden have not been

studied. This study hence investigates the effects of personal income, income inequality and

average income in municipalities on self-rated health in the Northern Sweden.

Methods: The data is drawn from the Swedish Public Health Survey Health on Equal Terms

(HET) 2014 and includes residents of Norrland counties (Västerbotten, Västernorrland,

Jämtland and Norrbotten) aged 16 – 85 years. The sample consists of 25,646 individuals

nested within 44 municipalities of Norrland counties. Five multi-level logistic regression

models are used to assess the association between income inequality and self-rated health.

Key Findings: Personal income is significantly association with self-rated health showing a

gradient. The odds of reporting poor health are 2.47 times among the poorest compared to

the richest. The odds increase from 27% in the second richest quintile to 147% in the poorest

quintile. Municipality income inequality is also associated with self-rated health. The most

unequal municipalities had a 15% reduced odds of reporting poor health and no association

between average income at municipality level and health was found. Compositional factors

explain most of the variation in self-rated health, as there was no clustering of self-rated

health by municipalities.

Conclusion: There is an inverse association between personal income inequality and selfrated

health. Income inequality at municipality level showed a protective effect against poor

health. In Northern Sweden, there exist no contextual effect of income inequality on selfrated

health but rather the composition of the municipalities could explain the association

between income inequality and health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. , 43 p.
Series
Centre for Public Health Report Series, ISSN 1651-341x ; 2016:14
Keyword [en]
Income Inequality; Sweden; Norrland; Self-rated Health; Health Inequalities;
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131504OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-131504DiVA: diva2:1074641
External cooperation
Landstingen i Västerbotten, Västernorrland, Jämtland och Norrbotten
Educational program
Master's Programme in Public Health
Presentation
2016-05-24, Umeå Universitet, Umeå, 11:33 (English)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-02-15 Created: 2017-02-15 Last updated: 2017-02-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf