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Horizontal equity accessing health care services in Norrland, Sweden: Cross-sectional study: analysing inequities utilizing health services by socioeconomic status for men and women
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
2016 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background: Fulfilling equity guidelines in access to health care has a major importance to avoid systematically created social injustice. Despite, fairness in access to care is a goal in any health system, there are concerns regarding socioeconomic inequities accessing care in high-income countries. Aim of this study was to control for existence of inequities accessing health care services by socioeconomic statues stratified by sex in Norrland, Sweden.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Northern Sweden. “Health on equal terms” survey data form 2014 was used (n= 25,667), which used two-stage complex probabilistic sample, that ensures the representative of municipality and county level. Measures used included socioeconomic variables as exposure, health care utilization as outcome measures and health need, place of birth and place of residency as adjusting variables. Logistic regression was used to determine the possible association between socioeconomic variables and health care use adjusted for need by gender.

Results: Both men and women in low socioeconomic statues reported to use more health care services in Norrland. While no statistically significant inequity according to socioeconomic status accessing health for both genders appeared. Only men in poor quintile have significantly higher odds to be hospitalized. Women were more likely to use primary health care services, while men had higher odds to specialist service or hospital care use. People in poorest quintile odds using health care decreased after need adjustment.

Conclusion: No statistically significant socioeconomic inequity accessing health care services emerged from this study. Poor men seem to have highest risk to be hospitalized in Norrland and lowest quintile relates to decline in the utilization of health care services after adjusting for health needs. Income seems to have special effect on access to health care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. , 33 p.
Series
Centre for Public Health Report Series, ISSN 1651-341x ; 2016:40
Keyword [en]
Horizontal equity accessing health care services, Norrland, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131698OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-131698DiVA: diva2:1075332
External cooperation
Hälsa på lika vilkor - Landstingen i Jämtland, Västernorrland, Västerbotten och Norrbotten
Educational program
Master's Programme in Public Health
Presentation
2016-05-24, Umeå Universitet, Umeå, 09:34 (English)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-02-17 Created: 2017-02-17 Last updated: 2017-02-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf