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Associations between Ischemic Stroke Follow-Up, Socioeconomic Status, and Adherence to Secondary Preventive Drugs in Southern Sweden: Observations from the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke)
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
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2017 (English)In: Neuroepidemiology, ISSN 0251-5350, E-ISSN 1423-0208, Vol. 48, no 1/2, 32-38 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Currently, the knowledge that one has on adequate stroke follow-up practices is limited. We report associations between 90-day stroke follow-up, socio-economy and adherence to secondary prevention in southern Sweden.

METHODS: Data on 5,602 patients with ischemic stroke January 1, 2008-December 31, 2010, were obtained from Riksstroke and linked to official registers for information on education, birth country, doctor's follow-ups, and secondary prevention. Primary adherence at 4 months and persistence at 14 months post-stroke were calculated for warfarin, statins, antihypertensive, and antiplatelet drugs.

RESULTS: The 90-day follow-up rate was 75%. Patients not receiving a 90-day follow-up had lower age-adjusted OR of persistent drug use at 14 months for antihypertensive agents (OR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.60-0.91) and for antiplatelet drugs (OR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.60-0.87). Drug adherence rates 14 months post-stroke were 85% for antiplatelet drugs, 69% for warfarin, 88% for antihypertensive agents, and 76% for statins. One in three patients discontinued using one or more drug class within 14 months, and nonadherence was associated with activities of daily living dependency at 3 months (age-adjusted OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.57-0.69), but not with age, gender, or educational status.

CONCLUSIONS: The use of secondary preventive drugs decreases over the first year after stroke and remains suboptimal. Specific reasons for nonadherence warrant further study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2017. Vol. 48, no 1/2, 32-38 p.
Keyword [en]
Ischemic stroke, Secondary prevention, Medication adherence, Socio-economic factors, Follow-up
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131978DOI: 10.1159/000456618ISI: 000403361900004PubMedID: 28237982OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-131978DiVA: diva2:1077508
Available from: 2017-02-27 Created: 2017-02-27 Last updated: 2017-07-03Bibliographically approved

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