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Maintained memory in aging is associated with young epigenetic age
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
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2017 (English)In: Neurobiology of Aging, ISSN 0197-4580, E-ISSN 1558-1497, Vol. 55, 167-171 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Epigenetic alterations during aging have been proposed to contribute to decline in physical and cognitive functions, and accelerated epigenetic aging has been associated with disease and all-cause mortality later in life. In this study, we estimated epigenetic age dynamics in groups with different memory trajectories (maintained high performance, average decline, and accelerated decline) over a 15-year period. Epigenetic (DNA-methylation [DNAm]) age was assessed, and delta age (DNAm age - chronological age) was calculated in blood samples at baseline (age: 55-65 years) and 15 years later in 52 age- and gender-matched individuals from the Betula study in Sweden. A lower delta DNAm age was observed for those with maintained memory functions compared with those with average (p = 0.035) or accelerated decline (p = 0.037). Moreover, separate analyses revealed that DNAm age at follow-up, but not chronologic age, was a significant predictor of dementia (p = 0.019). Our findings suggest that young epigenetic age contributes to maintained memory in aging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 55, 167-171 p.
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Other Basic Medicine
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URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132221DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.02.009ISI: 000405068100018PubMedID: 28292535OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-132221DiVA: diva2:1078925
Available from: 2017-03-07 Created: 2017-03-07 Last updated: 2017-08-02Bibliographically approved

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Degerman, SofieJosefsson, MariaNordin Adolfsson, AnnelieWennstedt, SigridLandfors, MattiasHaider, ZahraPudas, SaraHultdin, MagnusNyberg, LarsAdolfsson, Rolf
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Department of Medical BiosciencesCentre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR)PsychiatryUmeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI)Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB)Department of Radiation Sciences
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