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Biogeography of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.): Insights from a genome-wide study
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) together with the sister species Siberian spruce (P. obovata Ledeb.) form a vast continuous distribution over Eurasia. The present distribution of P. abies in Europe was formed recently, after the last glacial maximum. Theories about the colonization routes and history of this species differ depending on the datasets examined to date. This thesis aims to investigate the genetic structure and diversity of P. abies and establish its glacial refugia and postglacial migration. A range-wide sampling was performed of both P. abies and P. obovata, and a genotyping-by-sequencing approach was used to obtain whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. Two major genetic lineages of P. abies were found; northern and central Europe. The northern lineage was further divided into a Scandinavian and a north-east European cluster; the Scandinavian cluster being more closely related to P. obovata and the north-east European cluster to the central European lineage. Introgression from P. obovata was detected far into northern Fennoscandia. The central European lineage was divided into an Alpine and a Carpathian cluster, originating from different glacial refugia. Genetic diversity was higher in the northern part of the range, which can be attributed to the relatively large refugium that recolonized this area, as well as introgression from P. obovata. Genetic diversity was also somewhat elevated where the two central European clusters meet, as is expected in areas where two previously isolated lineages admix. This study is the first range-wide investigation of P. abies using whole-genome SNP information, and shows how the genetic structure of the species has been shaped by the last glacial maximum and postglacial recolonization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , 28 p.
Keyword [en]
Genetic diversity, genotyping-by-sequencing, Picea abies, population structure, postglacial migration
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132875OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-132875DiVA: diva2:1084066
Educational program
Master's Programme in Ecology
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-03-23 Created: 2017-03-23 Last updated: 2017-03-23Bibliographically approved

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Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences
Evolutionary Biology

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf