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Responses of riparian plants to habitat changes following restoration of channelized streams
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Forest and ConservationSciences, University of British Columbia,Vancouver, Canada.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. (Arcum)
2017 (English)In: Ecohydrology, ISSN 1936-0584, E-ISSN 1936-0592, Vol. 10, no 1, UNSP e1798Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ecological effects of stream restoration were evaluated by comparing riparian vegetation, flooding, and habitat properties between channelized and two types of restored streams in northern Sweden. Channelized streams were straightened and cleared of in-stream boulders and wood >50 years ago to facilitate timber floating. Basic restoration (performed 8-10 years ago) returned cleared material back to the channels, and enhanced restoration (3 years ago) added large structural elements (boulders and downed trees) to previously basic-restored streams. Riparian inundation duration increased only after enhanced restoration. Similarly, enhanced-restored reaches had the highest amount of substrate available for plant establishment compared to channelized and basic-restored streams. In contrast, soil biochemical properties (pH and C:N ratio) did not improve following either restoration effort. Riparian plant cover was higher at both restored types than channelized reaches. Plant species richness was higher at plot-scale level (0.25 m(2)) at both restored types in the most species-rich elevation levels compared to channelized reaches, whereas at the reach-scale (>700 m(2) of riparian area), species richness did not differ among stream types. Similarly, species composition segregated between channelized and restored reaches only at the plot scale. We found no significant differences in riparian vegetation between the two restored types. The lack of positive responses of vegetation to enhanced restoration and to variables that changed immediately after restoration (inundation, habitat area) implies that responses were either slower than expected or the changes in hydrology and substrate availability were not as important for riparian flora as believed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL , 2017. Vol. 10, no 1, UNSP e1798
Keyword [en]
channelization, flooding, habitat quality and quantity, riparian vegetation, stream restoration, vascular plants
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132835DOI: 10.1002/eco.1798ISI: 000393870100024OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-132835DiVA: diva2:1087093
Available from: 2017-04-05 Created: 2017-04-05 Last updated: 2017-04-05Bibliographically approved

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Kuglerova, LenkaJansson, Roland
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
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  • de-DE
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