umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Population-based study shows that teenage girls with asthma had impaired health-related quality of life.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.)
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.)
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (The OLIN Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.)
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIM: This study examined the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of teenagers with and without asthma, including the impact of their sex, allergic conditions, smoking, living conditions and physical activity.

METHODS: The Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) studies recruited a cohort of schoolchildren in 2006. The parents of all children aged 7-8 years in three municipalities were invited to complete a questionnaire and 2,585 (96%) participated. The cohort was followed up at the ages of 11-12 years and 14-15 years with high participation rates. At 14-15 years, the HRQoL questionnaire KIDSCREEN-10 and Asthma Control Test were added.

RESULTS: Girls with current asthma at 14-15 years had a lower mean HRQoL score than girls without asthma (46.4 versus 49.3, p<0.001), but this was not seen among boys (53.8 versus 52.8, p=0.373). Poor HRQoL was related to current asthma, uncontrolled asthma and teenage onset of asthma. It was also related to eczema, living in a single parent household, maternal smoking, daily smoking and inversely related to physical activity.

CONCLUSION: Teenage girls with asthma had lower HRQoL than girls without asthma. Possible interventions to improve HRQoL among teenagers with asthma were identified: increasing asthma control, preventing smoking and promoting physical activity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keyword [en]
asthma control, health-related quality of life, physical activity, smoking, teenagers
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133419DOI: 10.1111/apa.13847PubMedID: 28345180OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-133419DiVA: diva2:1087788
Available from: 2017-04-10 Created: 2017-04-10 Last updated: 2017-04-10

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hedman, LinneaAndersson, MartinBackman, HelenaJansson, Sven-ArneRönmark, Eva
By organisation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
In the same journal
Acta Paediatrica
Environmental Health and Occupational Health

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 1 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf