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Perceived effectiveness and mechanisms of community peer-based programmes for Spinal Cord Injuries- a systematic review of qualitative findings
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Central Queensland University, School of Human Health and Social Sciences, Physiotherapy Program, North Rockhampton, Australia; Alli Opsi, Not-for-profit Organization, Thessaloniki, Greece.
2017 (English)In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 55, no 3, 225-234 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study design: Systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative findings.

Objectives: To establish the perceived effectiveness and mechanisms of community peer-based programmes based on narratives of consumers with spinal cord injury (SCI).

Methods: Scopus, Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Health Source, Medline, PsycARTICLES, PsychINFO, SPORTSDiscus and ProQuest were searched for articles published in English between January 1990 and December 2015. Qualitative studies referring to community peer-based interventions were included if most cases had a SCI. The results section of included studies was extracted and entered in NVivo. Data were inductively coded and analysed according to the three phases of Thematic Synthesis.

Results: The search yielded 1402 unique records, out of which 126 were scrutinised in full. Four studies were appraised based on eight criteria and were finally included in the analysis. Three analytical themes emerged: (1) a unique learning environment created by the right mixture of learning resources, learning processes and a can-do attitude; (2) peer mentors—a unique learning resource with high level of relatedness that eases and empowers participants; and (3) an intervention that responds to important unmet needs and unrealised potential.

Conclusions: Community peer-based programmes for people with SCI provide individualised training in important life areas, using a variety of learning resources and a plethora of learning processes. The high level of perceived effectiveness suggests that this type of intervention is an important tool of health systems post discharge from initial rehabilitation. Community organisations should be supported with evaluating their programmes through quality research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 55, no 3, 225-234 p.
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133815DOI: 10.1038/sc.2016.147ISI: 000395924400003PubMedID: 27845356OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-133815DiVA: diva2:1089002
Available from: 2017-04-18 Created: 2017-04-18 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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