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Terrestrial support of lake food webs: Synthesis reveals controls over cross-ecosystem resource use
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2017 (English)In: Science Advances, ISSN 0036-8156, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 3, no 3, e1601765Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Widespread evidence that organic matter exported from terrestrial into aquatic ecosystems supports recipient food webs remains controversial. A pressing question is not only whether high terrestrial support is possible but also what the general conditions are under which it arises. We assemble the largest data set, to date, of the isotopic composition (delta H-2, delta C-13, and delta N-15) of lake zooplankton and the resources at the base of their associated food webs. In total, our data set spans 559 observations across 147 lakes from the boreal to subtropics. By predicting terrestrial resource support from within-lake and catchment-level characteristics, we found that half of all consumer observations that is, the median were composed of at least 42% terrestrially derived material. In general, terrestrial support of zooplankton was greatest in lakes with large physical and hydrological connections to catchments that were rich in aboveground and belowground organic matter. However, some consumers responded less strongly to terrestrial resources where within-lake production was elevated. Our study shows that multiple mechanisms drive widespread cross-ecosystem support of aquatic consumers across Northern Hemisphere lakes and suggests that changes in terrestrial landscapes will influence ecosystem processes well beyond their boundaries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 3, no 3, e1601765
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133800DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1601765ISI: 000397044000038PubMedID: 28345035OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-133800DiVA: diva2:1089671
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2011-3908
Available from: 2017-04-20 Created: 2017-04-20 Last updated: 2017-04-21Bibliographically approved

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Karlsson, Jan
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Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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