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Men don’t think that far” – Interviewing men in Sweden aboutchlamydia and HIV testing during pregnancy from a discursivemasculinities construction perspective.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
2017 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 12, 107-115 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: We used qualitative research design to discursively explore expectant fathers’ perceptions of chlamydia and HIV, and their masculinity constructions about testing, and explored how they talked about their potential resistance towards testing and their pre-test emotions.

Study design: Twenty men were offered chlamydia and HIV testing at the beginning of their partner’s pregnancy. Those who agreed to be tested were interviewed in-depth; those who declined testing were also interviewed. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. The analysis was inspired by discourse analysis on masculinity.

Main outcome: Three discursive themes: Men prefer to suppress their vulnerability to STIs, Body and biology differ between men and women and Men have mixed emotions around STI testing underscore the informants’ conversations and sometimes conflicting thoughts about STI testing.

Conclusion: The majority of men talked about pregnancy as a feminine territory, raised uncertainties about men’s roles in the transmission of STIs, and talked about women’s and men’s essentially different bodies and biology, where few men realised that they could infect both their partner and the unborn child. This knowledge gap that men have must become apparent to healthcare providers, and policy makers must give men equal access to the reproductive arena.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 12, 107-115 p.
Keyword [en]
Men, Pregnancy, Sexual transmitted infections, Masculinity, Qualitative method, Gender
National Category
Nursing Gender Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134027DOI: 10.1016/j.srhc.2017.03.007ISI: 000401884100018OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-134027DiVA: diva2:1090835
Available from: 2017-04-25 Created: 2017-04-25 Last updated: 2017-06-30Bibliographically approved

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Monica, ChristiansonBoman, Jens
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf