umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Phenol-soluble Modulin α Peptide Toxins from aggressive Staphylococcus aureus induce rapid Formation of neutrophil extracellular Traps through a reactive Oxygen species-independent Pathway
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, 257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neutrophils have the ability to capture and kill microbes extracellularly through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These are DNA and protein structures that neutrophils release extracellularly and are believed to function as a defense mechanism against microbes. The classic NET formation process, triggered by, e.g., bacteria, fungi, or by direct stimulation of protein kinase C through phorbol myristate acetate, is an active process that takes several hours and relies on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are further modified by myeloperoxidase (MPO). We show here that NET-like structures can also be formed by neutrophils after interaction with phenol-soluble modulin alpha (PSM alpha) that are cytotoxic membrane-disturbing peptides, secreted from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). The PSMa-induced NETs contained the typical protein markers and were able to capture microbes. The PSMa-induced NET structures were disintegrated upon prolonged exposure to DNase-positive S. aureus but not on exposure to DNase-negative Candida albicans. Opposed to classic NETosis, PSMa-triggered NET formation occurred very rapidly, independently of ROS or MPO, and was also manifest at 4 degrees C. These data indicate that rapid NETs release may result from cytotoxic membrane disturbance by PSMa peptides, a process that may be of importance for CA-MRSA virulence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 8, 257
Keyword [en]
community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, PSM, NETs, ROS, FPR2, MPO, utrophil elastase, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133767DOI: 10.3389/fimmu.2017.00257ISI: 000395693300001PubMedID: 28337204OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-133767DiVA: diva2:1092467
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2017-05-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(6797 kB)16 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 6797 kBChecksum SHA-512
2b0c7cc7a7e37d40f9149d80fcbfd9d5e69a014dba80b305790a52f710cf79a5112131debdfd4c910f118edd816fc832fd4be8410a6a7eb26d2b7b6c51f288d5
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Stylianou, MariosUrban, Constantin F.
By organisation
Department of Clinical Microbiology
In the same journal
Frontiers in Immunology
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 16 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 117 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf