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Mapping an invisible population: the uneven geography of second-home tourism
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Umeå University.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2299-6833
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
2017 (English)In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, 1-17 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Second-home tourism is a very popular form of tourism in many countries, particularly in the Nordic countries. More than half of the Swedish population have access to second homes. Previous studies have revealed that there is great variation between different second homes. Examples range from rustic Australian shacks, lonely cabins in the Norwegian mountains, spacious Swedish archipelago villas and palatial Russian dachas. Still, second homes are often seen and analysed as a unitary category – a perspective that obscures the considerable heterogeneity within the category as well as spatial differences in the impact of second-home tourism. Using a second-home typology from previous research and data on about 660,000 second homes, we analyse the heterogeneity of second homes by mapping the composition of the Swedish second-home stock. Results show the uneven geography of second-home tourism, revealing significant and sometimes steep differences between peripheral areas and urban hinterlands, tourism hot-spots, and areas in decline. Based on these results, we assert that there is good cause to move away from using second homes as a unitary category. Instead, we argue for viewing second homes as an umbrella concept with dwelling use in focus. This enables a greater sensibility to place and more accurate analyses of the uneven impacts of second-home tourism. The results also give greater insights into the impact of the ‘invisible population’ of second-home owners from a public planning perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor & Francis Group, 2017. 1-17 p.
Keyword [en]
second homes, tourism, housing, planning, mobility, uneven development, peripheral regions, invisible population, Sweden
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135488DOI: 10.1080/14616688.2017.1331260OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-135488DiVA: diva2:1102625
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29 Last updated: 2017-05-29

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf