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My Friend Is the Man: Changing Masculinities, Otherness and Friendship in The Good Soldier and Women in Love
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesisAlternative title
Min kompis, mannen : Föränderliga maskuliniteter, den andre och vänskap i The Good Soldier och Women in Love (Swedish)
Abstract [en]

This essay explores how masculinity is portrayed in The Good Soldier (Ford Madox Ford) and Women in Love (D.H Lawrence), and how Victorian and Edwardian masculinity ideals impact the friendships between the characters John Dowell and Edward Ashburnham and Rupert Birkin and Gerald Crich. The novels portray how hegemonic masculinity in Edwardian Britain changed from one type of masculinity, based on physical dominance, to include another, which drew on expert knowledge, capitalism and rationalism. In the texts, these masculinities are buttressed by the comparison to a male Other. In The Good Soldier, Edward Ashburnham stands for the ideals connected to dominance through his roles as landlord and soldier, and he is depicted as the “manlier” character in comparison to John Dowell. The same kind of coupling is found in Women in Love, where Gerald Crich represents both older ideals of dominance and newer ideals of expertise and rationality and Rupert Birkin is the relational opposite. Both Rupert Birkin and John Dowell are categorized as “not man” in the texts in order to emphasize that Edward Ashburnham and Gerald Crich are the “real” men. However, when the “manlier” characters have died both John Dowell and Rupert Birkin perpetuate masculine ideals, either by emulating hegemonic ideals or by redefining them. Furthermore, the Victorian and Edwardian conceptions of masculinity and male friendship inhibit the characters from forming emotionally close friendships. In both texts, emotional intimacy is portrayed as precarious and a more impersonal from of friendship that entails loyalty to a group or cause, camaraderie, is preferred. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , 37 p.
Keyword [en]
Ford Madox Ford, D.H. Lawrence, Masculinity, Other, Friendship
National Category
General Literature Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135734OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-135734DiVA: diva2:1105687
Subject / course
Engelska med litteraturvetenskaplig inriktning, examensarbete för masterexamen
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Examiners
Available from: 2017-06-05 Created: 2017-06-05 Last updated: 2017-06-05Bibliographically approved

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General Literature Studies

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf