umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Effects of climate warming on the performance of three boreal tree seedling species in interaction with moss cover and fire history
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Forest regeneration in the form of successful seedling establishment is a key factor for the persistence of a healthy forest ecosystem. Tree seedlings grow in a complex environment shaped by over- and understory and competition for light, nutrients and water. Not much research has been done on how climate change is impacting on seedling performance through direct and indirect warming effects including possible interactions with the growth environment i.e. understory vegetation. To elucidate these, seedlings of B. pubescens, P. sylvestris and P. abies were planted into a full-factorial experiment consisting of randomly assigned plant functional group (moss) removal in combination with passive warming (open-top chambers [OTCs]) along a post-fire chronosequence. Each seedling’s survival and growth had been surveyed over a period of three years (not as part of this thesis). At the end of the experiment, growth assessment in terms of biomass determination was done, by harvesting selected individuals. Growth has been found to be species-specific but without evidence of a direct or interactive warming effect. The survival analysis highlights that mosses promoted a positive warming effect on survival in the young and intermediate successional stages regardless of seedling species. In the old successional stage warming reduced survival regardless of moss presence explicitly for B. pubescens and P. sylvestris. If, as anticipated, climate change induces a shift toward younger forest stands by altering the fire frequency and climate warms, moss cover can therefore become a critical factor for seedling survival in the boreal forest.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136177OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-136177DiVA: diva2:1109667
Educational program
Master's Programme in Ecology
Presentation
2017-06-02, 10:00 (English)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-06-14 Last updated: 2017-06-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1207 kB)25 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1207 kBChecksum SHA-512
e1f0882274f0860ffa8fe1db455207464f1d02093ab46b863e7a5e27a177d82499de2079cba56e7dba2b7b4db29550e38a8e280db52f91986ba48f90f1006fc5
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 25 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Total: 48 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf