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Facing different predators: adaptiveness of behavioral and morphological traits under predation
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
2017 (English)In: Current Zoology, ISSN 1674-5507, Vol. 63, no 3, 249-257 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Predation is thought to be one of the main structuring forces in animal communities. However, selective predation is often measured on isolated traits in response to a single predatory species, but only rarely are selective forces on several traits quantified or even compared between different predators naturally occurring in the same system. In the present study, we therefore measured behavioral and morphological traits in young-of-the-year Eurasian perch Perca fluviatilis and compared their selective values in response to the 2 most common predators, adult perch and pike Esox lucius. Using mixed effects models and model averaging to analyze our data, we quantified and compared the selectivity of the 2 predators on the different morphological and behavioral traits. We found that selection on the behavioral traits was higher than on morphological traits and perch predators preyed overall more selectively than pike predators. Pike tended to positively select shallow bodied and nonvigilant individuals (i.e. individuals not performing predator inspection). In contrast, perch predators selected mainly for bolder juvenile perch (i.e. individuals spending more time in the open, more active), which was most important. Our results are to the best of our knowledge the first that analyzed behavioral and morphological adaptations of juvenile perch facing 2 different predation strategies. We found that relative specific predation intensity for the divergent traits differed between the predators, providing some additional ideas why juvenile perch display such a high degree of phenotypic plasticity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS , 2017. Vol. 63, no 3, 249-257 p.
Keyword [en]
behavior, morphological variation, Perca fluviatilis, perch, pike, predator-specific defenses, selective edation
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137055DOI: 10.1093/cz/zow056ISI: 000402561200003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-137055DiVA: diva2:1115076
Available from: 2017-06-26 Created: 2017-06-26 Last updated: 2017-06-26Bibliographically approved

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Heynen, Martina
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Department of ChemistryDepartment of Ecology and Environmental Sciences
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf