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Coffee, tea and melanoma risk: findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 140, no 10, 2246-2255 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What's new? Laboratory studies suggest that coffee and tea protect against melanoma, but epidemiological findings are inconsistent. Here the authors studied more than 400,000 participants within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and confirmed an inverse association between caffeinated coffee consumption and melanoma risk. No association was found with decaffeinated coffee or tea. Interestingly, drinking coffee only protected men, but not women, from developing the often fatal skin cancer, raising interesting questions about gender-specific hormones or coffee habits influencing this association. In vitro and animal studies suggest that bioactive constituents of coffee and tea may have anticarcinogenic effects against cutaneous melanoma; however, epidemiological evidence is limited to date. We examined the relationships between coffee (total, caffeinated or decaffeinated) and tea consumption and risk of melanoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). EPIC is a multicentre prospective study that enrolled over 500,000 participants aged 25-70 years from ten European countries in 1992-2000. Information on coffee and tea drinking was collected at baseline using validated country-specific dietary questionnaires. We used adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations between coffee and tea consumption and melanoma risk. Overall, 2,712 melanoma cases were identified during a median follow-up of 14.9 years among 476,160 study participants. Consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with melanoma risk among men (HR for highest quartile of consumption vs. non-consumers 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.69) but not among women (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.62-1.47). There were no statistically significant associations between consumption of decaffeinated coffee or tea and the risk of melanoma among both men and women. The consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with melanoma risk among men in this large cohort study. Further investigations are warranted to confirm our findings and clarify the possible role of caffeine and other coffee compounds in reducing the risk of melanoma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 140, no 10, 2246-2255 p.
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134695DOI: 10.1002/ijc.30659ISI: 000399313200008PubMedID: 28218395OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-134695DiVA: diva2:1118414
Available from: 2017-06-30 Created: 2017-06-30 Last updated: 2017-06-30Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
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