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Resting-state functional connectivity of the amygdala and longitudinal changes in depression severity in adolescent depression.
Karolinska Institutet, University of California San Francsisco. (Barn- och Ungdomspsykiatri)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5790-0518
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 207, 86-94 p., S0165-0327(16)31054-0Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The incidence of major depressive disorder (MDD) rises during adolescence, yet the neural mechanisms of MDD during this key developmental period are unclear. Altered amygdala resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) has been associated with both adolescent and adult MDD, as well as symptom improvement in response to treatment in adults. However, no study to date has examined whether amygdala RSFC is associated with changes in depressive symptom severity in adolescents.

METHOD: We examined group differences in amygdala RSFC between medication-naïve depressed adolescents (N=48) and well-matched healthy controls (N=53) cross-sectionally. We then longitudinally examined whether baseline amygdala RSFC was associated with change in depression symptoms three months later in a subset of the MDD group (N=24).

RESULTS: Compared to healthy controls, depressed adolescents showed reduced amygdala-based RSFC with the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC). Within the depressed group, more positive baseline RSFC between the amygdala and insulae was associated with greater reduction in depression symptoms three months later.

LIMITATIONS: Only a subset of depressed participants was assessed at follow-up and treatment type and delivery were not standardized.

CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent depression may be characterized by dysfunction of frontolimbic circuits (amygdala-DLPFC, amygdala-VMPFC) underpinning emotional regulation, whereas those circuits (amygdala-insula) subserving affective integration may index changes in depression symptom severity and may therefore potentially serve as a candidate biomarker for treatment response. Furthermore, these results suggest that the biomarkers of MDD presence are distinct from those associated with change in depression symptoms over time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 207, 86-94 p., S0165-0327(16)31054-0
Keyword [en]
Adolescent major depression, Amygdala, Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, Resting-state, Ventromedial prefrontal cortex
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135776DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.09.026PubMedID: 27716542OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-135776DiVA: diva2:1120549
Available from: 2017-07-06 Created: 2017-07-06 Last updated: 2017-07-06

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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More styles
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