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Postprandial metabolic response of breast-fed infants and infants fed lactose-free vs regular infant formula: a randomized controlled trial
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
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2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, 3640Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lactose intolerance is a major concern driving the growth of lactose-free foods including lactose-free infant formula. It is unknown what the metabolic consequence is of consumption of a formula where lactose has been replaced with corn syrup solids (CSS). Here, a randomized double-blinded intervention study was conducted where exclusively formula-fed infants were fed formula containing either lactose or CSS-based infant formula and compared with an equal number of exclusively breast-fed infants. Plasma metabolites and insulin were measured at baseline, 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after feeding. Differences in plasma metabolite profiles for formula-fed infants included a rapid increase in circulating amino acids, creatinine and urea compared with breast-fed infants. At 120 min post-feeding, insulin was significantly elevated in formula-fed compared with breast-fed infants. Infants fed lactose-based formula had the highest levels of glucose at 120 min, and leucine, isoleucine, valine and proline at 90 and 120 min, whereas infants fed CSS-based formula had the lowest levels of non-esterified fatty acids at all time points, and glucose at 120 min. Overall, these differences highlight that changes in infant formula composition impact infant metabolism, and show that metabolomics is a powerful tool to help with development of improved infant formulas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2017. Vol. 7, 3640
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Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137636DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-03975-4ISI: 000403413700002PubMedID: 28623320OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-137636DiVA: diva2:1127668
Available from: 2017-07-18 Created: 2017-07-18 Last updated: 2017-07-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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