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Diabetes and male sex are key risk factor correlates of the extent of coronary artery calcification: a Euro-CCAD study
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. (Heart Centre)
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
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2017 (English)In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 31, no 7, 1096-1102 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and Aims: Although much has been written about the conventional cardiovascular risk factor correlates of the extent of coronary artery calcification (CAC), few studies have been carried out on symptomatic patients. This paper assesses the potential ability of risk factors to associate with an increasing CAC score. Methods: From the European Calcific Coronary Artery Disease (Euro-CCAD) cohort, we retrospectively investigated 6309 symptomatic patients, 62% male, from Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the USA. All had conventional cardiovascular risk factor assessment and CI scanning for CAC scoring. Results: Among all patients, male sex (OR = 4.85, p < 0.001) and diabetes (OR = 236, p < 0.001) were the most important risk factors of CAC extent, with age, hypertension, dyslipidemia and smoking also showing a relationship. Among patients with CAC, age, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia were associated with an increasing CAC score in males and females, with diabetes being the strongest dichotomous risk factor (p < 0.001 for both). These results were echoed in quantile regression, where diabetes was consistently the most important correlate with CAC extent in every quantile in both males and females. To a lesser extent, hypertension and dyslipidemia were also associated in the high CAC quantiles and the low CAC quantiles respectively. Conclusion: In addition to age and male sex in the total population, diabetes is the most important correlate of CAC extent in both sexes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 31, no 7, 1096-1102 p.
Keyword [en]
Coronary calcification extent, Risk factors, Diabetes, Gender, Hypertension
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137796DOI: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2017.03.013ISI: 000404088700006PubMedID: 28499962OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-137796DiVA: diva2:1128651
Available from: 2017-07-27 Created: 2017-07-27 Last updated: 2017-07-27Bibliographically approved

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Nicoll, RachelWiklund, UrbanHenein, Michael
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Department of Public Health and Clinical MedicineDepartment of Radiation Sciences
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
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