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Age-related associations between work over-commitment and zest for work among Swedish employees from a cross-sectional and longitudinal perspective
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
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2017 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 57, no 2, 269-279 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In aging societies, zest for work may be pivotal when deciding to stay occupationally active longer. Psychosocial work stress is a prevalent public health problem and may have an impact on zest for work. Work over-commitment (WOC) is a personal coping strategy for work stress with excessive striving and a health risk. However, the long-term effect of WOC on zest for work is poorly understood.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the age-related associations of work over-commitment with zest for work.

METHODS: During 1996-1998 and 2000-2003, predominantly industrial workers (n = 2940) participated in the WOLF-Norrland study and responded to a questionnaire referring to socio-demographics, WOC, zest for work, effort-reward imbalance proxies, and mental health. Age-adjusted multiple logistic regressions were performed with original and imputed datasets.

RESULTS: Cross-sectionally, work overcommitted middle-aged employees had an increased prevalence of poor zest for work compared to their contemporaries without WOC (OR: 3.74 [95%-CI 2.19; 6.40]). However, in a longitudinal analysis associations between onset of 'poor zest for work' and the WOC subscales 'need for approval' (OR: 3.29 [95%-CI 1.04; 10.37]) and 'inability to withdraw from work' (OR: 5.14 [95%-CI 1.32; 20.03]) were observed.

CONCLUSION: The longitudinal findings among older employees could be relevant regarding the expected need to remain occupationally active longer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2017. Vol. 57, no 2, 269-279 p.
Keyword [en]
Work stress, WOC, ERI, coping
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137898DOI: 10.3233/WOR-172555ISI: 000404774400013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-137898DiVA: diva2:1129428
Available from: 2017-08-03 Created: 2017-08-03 Last updated: 2017-08-03Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf