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The transition to chlorine free pulp revisited: Nordic heterogeneity in environmental regulation and R&D collaboration
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1087-9656
2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 165, 1328-1339 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the development paths leading to the transition to cleaner bleaching technologies in the pulp industry. It devotes particular attention to the key features of the Swedish transition, but also compares this to the Finnish experiences. The empirical investigation builds on an analytical framework highlighting the conditions under which pollution regulations can provide efficient incentives for deep emission reductions at industrial plants. Existing and new archive material, including not least comprehensive license trial acts for Swedish pulp mills over an extended time period, are studied. Based on this historical analysis our findings contradict previous literature, the latter emphasizing that pressures from consumers and the public were the most significant driving forces behind the adoption ofeand innovation inealternative bleaching technologies during the late 1980s. Instead, this paper asserts, the green pulp transition was characterized by regulation-induced technological change and was made possible by long history of industry-wide cooperation in environmental R&D. Furthermore, while previous research has emphasized the leading role of the Nordic countries in green pulp innovation, we identify a number of profound differences between Finland and Sweden. These emerge from various national contexts in terms of, for instance, industry structures and strategies, political cultures, and regulatory styles. Finally, at a more general level the paper provides a few policy implications for supporting the ongoing transition towards a forest-based bioeconomy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 165, 1328-1339 p.
Keyword [en]
Environmental regulation; Technical change; Pulp industry; Bleaching technology
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Economic History; Economics; sustainable development
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138060DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.07.190OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-138060DiVA: diva2:1129503
Projects
Klimatpolitikens komplexitet: en framkomlig reglering av industrins koldioxidutsläpp. /Climate Policy Complexity: Second-best Regulation of Carbon Dioxine Emissions in Industrial Sectors.Förutsättningar för grön strukturomvandling. Den svenska miljösektorns utveckling 1970-2015
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 42329-1Swedish Research Council, 2016-03024
Available from: 2017-08-03 Created: 2017-08-03 Last updated: 2017-08-03

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Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf