umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Do atypical individuals make atypical choices?: Examining how gender patterns in personality relate to occupational choice and wages among five professions in Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7680-334X
2018 (English)In: Gender Issues, ISSN 1098-092X, E-ISSN 1936-4717, Vol. 5, p. 153-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article provides a close-up picture of gender and personality in relation to the gender composition of occupation and the gender wage gap. Using a survey of newly graduated highly educated men and women in five occupations in Sweden (engineers, lawyers, police officers, social workers and psychologists, n ≈ 2400), we examine (a) if personality traits—measured as Big Five traits, risk-taking and self-esteem—differ between men and women (b) if differences in personality traits are systematically related to the gender composition of the occupation, (c) if individuals who have chosen an occupation dominated by the other gender are gender-atypical in their personalities and, (d) how personality traits are related to wages and the gender wage gap. The results show significant gender differences in agreeableness, emotional stability and perceived risk-taking. The male-dominated occupations score higher on risk-taking than those dominated by females, but the pattern for agreeableness is less clear and the scores on emotional stability are no higher in these occupations. Further we find that individuals who have chosen a gender-atypical occupation tend to display gender atypical personality traits. In line with previous research, we find that risk-taking and self-esteem are positively related to wages but these associations do not account for gender differences in wages. The valuation of personality traits does not vary systematically with the gender composition of the occupations but being agreeable has a more negative wage effect for women than for men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018. Vol. 5, p. 153-178
Keywords [en]
gender, personality, self-esteem, occupation, wages
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138475DOI: 10.1007/s12147-017-9194-9ISI: 000430672300006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-138475DiVA, id: diva2:1135642
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2011-0816Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Grönlund, Anne

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Grönlund, Anne
By organisation
Department of Social Work
In the same journal
Gender Issues
Sociology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 118 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf