umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Pelagic Food web
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). (EcoChange)
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Biological Oceanography of the Baltic Sea / [ed] Snoeijs-Leijonmalm P, Schubert H, Radziejewska T, London: Springer Netherlands, 2017, 281-332 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]
  1. Environmental drivers and food web structure in the pelagic zone vary from south to north in the Baltic Sea. 
  2. While nitrogen is generally the limiting nutrient for primary production in the Baltic Sea, phosphorus is the limiting nutrient in the Bothnian Bay. 
  3. In the Gulf of Bothnia the food web is to a large extent driven by terrestrial allochthonous material, while autochthonous production dominates in the other parts of the Baltic Sea. 
  4. Changes in bacterioplankton, protist and zooplankton community composition from south to north are mainly driven by salinity. 
  5. Bacteria are crucial constituents of the pelagic food web (microbial loop) and in oxygen-poor and anoxic bottom waters where they mediate element transformations. 
  6. Diatoms and dinoflagellates are the major primary producers in the pelagic zone. Summer blooms of diazotrophic (nitrogen-fixing) filamentous cyanobacteria are typical of the Baltic Sea, especially in the Baltic Sea proper and the Gulf of Finland. 
  7. The mesozooplankton (mainly copepods and cladocerans) channel energy from primary producers and the microbial food web to fish and finally to the top predators in the pelagic system (waterbirds and mammals). 
  8. Herring and sprat populations are affected by the foraging intensity of their main predator (cod), and therefore the environmental conditions that affect cod may also influence mesozooplankton due to food web effects “cascading down the food web”. 
  9. Anthropogenic pressures, such as overexploitation of fish stocks, eutrophication, climate change, introduction of non-indigenous species and contamination of top predators by hazardous substances, cause changes in the pelagic food web that may have consequences for the balance and stability of the whole ecosystem.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Springer Netherlands, 2017. 281-332 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
biology, Environmental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138971DOI: 10.1007/978-94-007-0668-2ISBN: 978-94-007-0668-2 (electronic)ISBN: 978-94-007-0667-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-138971DiVA: diva2:1138371
Available from: 2017-09-05 Created: 2017-09-05 Last updated: 2017-09-14

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, Agneta
By organisation
Department of Ecology and Environmental SciencesUmeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF)
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 39 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf