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Aging of Organochlorine Pesticides and Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Muck Soil: Volatilization, Bioaccessibility, and Degradation
Environm Canada, Ctr Atmospher Res Expt, Sci & Technol Branch, Egbert, ON L0L 1N0, Canada.
Environm Canada, Ctr Atmospher Res Expt, Sci & Technol Branch, Egbert, ON L0L 1N0, Canada. (EcoChange)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7469-0532
2011 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 45, no 3, 958-963 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An organic rich muck soil which is highly contaminated with native organochlorine pesticide (OCs) was spiked with known amounts of (13)C-labeled OCs and nonlabeled polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Spiked soils were aged under indoor, outdoor, and sterile conditions and the change in volatility, surrogate bioaccessibility, and degradation of chemicals was monitored periodically over 730 d. Volatility was measured using a fugacity meter to characterize the soil-air partition coefficient (K(SA) = C(SOII)/C(AIR))). The fraction of bioaccessible residues was estimated by comparing recoveries of chemical with a mild extractant, hydroxylpropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) vs a harsh extractant, DCM. K(SA) of the spiked OCs in the nonsterile (Indoor, Outdoor) soils were initially lower and approached the K(SA) of native OCs over time, showing reduction of volatility upon aging. HPCD extractability of spiked OCs and PCBs were negatively correlated with K(SA), which suggests that volatility can be used as a surrogate for bioaccessibility. Degradation of endosulfans, PCB 8 and 28 was observed in the nonsterile soils, and (13)C(6)-alpha-HCH showed selective degradation of the (+) enantiomer. Enantiomer fractions (EF) in air and HPCD extracts were lower than in nonsterile soils, suggesting greater sequestering of the (+) enantiomer in the soil during microbial degradation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC , 2011. Vol. 45, no 3, 958-963 p.
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Research subject
Toxicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139430DOI: 10.1021/es102825wISI: 000286577100019PubMedID: 21204520OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-139430DiVA: diva2:1140545
Available from: 2017-09-12 Created: 2017-09-12 Last updated: 2017-09-12

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