umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Three dimensional kinematic analyses of finger movement control and association to brain activity responses: A pilot study on healthy individuals
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 57, 355- p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: An increased knowledge of how the brain control finger movements give us keys to understand the recovery of motor function after a brain injury. This knowledge is crucial for the development of reliable and valid assessment methods in the clinical evaluation of hand function.

Research question: How are individual finger movements represented in the brain? Investigating the associations between kinematics and brain activity responses in healthy individuals.

Methods: Keeping the others still. Finger movements were performed lying in the MR scanner in order to register brain activity response during the task. Optoelectronic cameras simultaneously monitored the positions of reflective markers affixed to each finger. The marker position data were used to calculate each finger's movement frequency (MF),  movement independence (“Individuation Index”, II), stationary ability (Stationarity Index, SI)[1][1]. fMRI data was analyzed by contrasting the finger movements against its active rest.

Results: Preliminary analyses showed that (1) the finger movements primarily activate sensorimotor areas in the contralateral hemisphere (Fig. 1A), (2) that use of kinematic parameters in the fMRI analyses improved spatial specificity and (3) II engage a number of cortical areas, while MF engage fewer areas (Fig. 1B–D). Further analyses will further explore activations maps for each individual finger.

Discussion: The inclusion of movement parameters in the fMRI analyses improves the specificity in the derived activation map, increasing the interpretability of the neural correlates of movement control. This advancement carries the promise for the development of better assessment methods of the recovery of function post-stroke with usability in rehabilitation practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 57, 355- p.
National Category
Physiotherapy Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Psychology
Research subject
physiotherapy; Radiology; Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139887DOI: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.06.464OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-139887DiVA: diva2:1144237
Note

Supplement 1, Meeting abstract P110

Available from: 2017-09-25 Created: 2017-09-25 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Grip, HelenaSelling, JonasRönnqvist, LouiseBoraxbekk, Carl-JohanHäger, Charlotte
By organisation
Department of Radiation SciencesCentre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR)PhysiotherapyDepartment of PsychologyUmeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI)
In the same journal
Gait & Posture
PhysiotherapyRadiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical ImagingPsychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 41 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf