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Watershed soil Cd loss after long-term agricultural practice and biochar amendment under four rainfall levels
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. (EcoChange)
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2017 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 122, 692-700 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Some heavy metals in farmland soil can be transported into the waterbody, affecting the water quality and sediment at the watershed outlet, which can be used to determine the historical loss pattern. Cd is a typical heavy metal leached from farmland that is related to phosphate fertilizers and carries serious environmental risk. The spatial-vertical pattern of Cd in soil and the vertical trend of Cd in the river sediment core were analyzed, which showed the migration and accumulation of Cd in the watershed. To prevent watershed Cd loss, biochar was employed, and leaching experiments were conducted to investigate the Cd loss from soil depending on the initial concentration. Four rainfall intensities, 1.25 mm/h, 2.50 mm/h, 5.00 mm/h, and 10.00 mm/h, were used to simulate typical rainfall scenarios for the study area. Biochar was prepared from corn straw after pretreatment with ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and pyrolysis at 400 °C under anoxic conditions. To identify the effects of biochar amendment on Cd migration, the biochar was mixed with soil for 90 days at concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 3.0%, and 5.0% soil by weight. The results showed that the Cd leaching load increased as the initial load and rainfall intensity increased and that eluviation caused surface Cd to diffuse to the deep soils. The biochar application caused more of the heavy metals to be immobilized in the amended soil rather than transported into the waterbody. The sorption efficiency of the biochar for Cd increased as the addition level increased to 3%, which showed better performance than the 5% addition level under some initial concentration and rainfall conditions. The research indicated that biochar is a potential material to prevent diffuse heavy metal pollution and that a lower addition makes the application more feasible.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 122, 692-700 p.
Keyword [en]
Biochar-amended soil, Sediment core, Soil Cd loss, Diffuse pollution control, Rainfall intensity
National Category
Water Engineering Soil Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140101DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2017.06.084ISI: 000407404300067OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-140101DiVA: diva2:1145744
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EcoChange
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2017-10-05Bibliographically approved

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Tysklind, MatsHaglund, Peter
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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