umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Environmental Policies and The Reproduction of Business as Usual: How Does It Work?
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
University of Surrey.
2019 (English)In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 120-138Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper aims to advance knowledge about corporate environmentalism by using new concepts and methods. We broaden the concept of the firm as "differentiated composite actor" by including not only managers but workers and unionists as actors. We descend into the "hidden abode of production" using Lefebvre’s concept of "everyday life" to explore the barriers environmental policies experience in this sphere. We base our explorations on life-history interviews to understand how the imaginaries of production are embedded in people's self-conceptions. We identify seven barriers to the implementation of environmental practices: deficient regulations, collusion between controller and controlled, de-prioritisation, hierarchism, compartmentalisation, specialisation, and social unsustainability. A "necessity discourse," legitimating the priority of efficiency and product quality over environmental sustainability, subjugates alternative sustainable practices. The paper concludes with a discussion of the results in the light of previous investigations, suggesting that the concept of the everyday could enrich future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019. Vol. 30, no 1, p. 120-138
Keywords [en]
corporate environmentalism, environmental practices, the everyday of production, necessity discourse
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140161DOI: 10.1080/10455752.2017.1371200Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85029458615OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-140161DiVA, id: diva2:1146148
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(412 kB)74 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 412 kBChecksum SHA-512
220fa2e727a4a1c6de13b0d76dd57065101a748283a605797e290d45088eb36b7f5d6afc1fdc765b72a2694ca7c2589a60678352ff253d33c64ceaf1fa370827
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Räthzel, Nora

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Räthzel, Nora
By organisation
Department of Sociology
In the same journal
Capitalism, Nature, Socialism
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 74 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 505 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf