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N-acylated derivatives of sulfamethoxazole block Chlamydia fatty acid synthesis and interact with FabF
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
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2017 (English)In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 61, no 10, article id e00716-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway is essential for bacterial lipid biosynthesis and continues to be a promising target for novel antibacterial compounds. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Chlamydia is capable of FASII and this pathway is indispensable for Chlamydia growth. Previously, a high-content screen with Chlamydia trachomatis-infected cells was performed, and acylated sulfonamides were identified to be potent growth inhibitors of the bacteria. C. trachomatis strains resistant to acylated sulfonamides were isolated by serial passage of a wild-type strain in the presence of low compound concentrations. Results from whole-genome sequencing of 10 isolates from two independent drug-resistant populations revealed that mutations that accumulated in fabF were predominant. Studies of the interaction between the FabF protein and small molecules showed that acylated sulfonamides directly bind to recombinant FabF in vitro and treatment of C. trachomatis-infected HeLa cells with the compounds leads to a decrease in the synthesis of Chlamydia fatty acids. This work demonstrates the importance of FASII for Chlamydia development and may lead to the development of new antimicrobials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American society for microbiology , 2017. Vol. 61, no 10, article id e00716-17
Keywords [en]
Chlamydia trachomatis, FAS, antimicrobial agents, drug targets
National Category
Microbiology Pharmaceutical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140637DOI: 10.1128/AAC.00716-17ISI: 000411481800016OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-140637DiVA, id: diva2:1150353
Available from: 2017-10-18 Created: 2017-10-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

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Mojica, Sergio A.Salin, OlliSunduru, NareshHedenström, MattiasAndersson, C. DavidNúñez-Otero, CarlosEngström, PatrikElofsson, MikaelGylfe, Åsa

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Mojica, Sergio A.Salin, OlliSunduru, NareshHedenström, MattiasAndersson, C. DavidNúñez-Otero, CarlosEngström, PatrikElofsson, MikaelGylfe, Åsa
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Department of Clinical MicrobiologyDepartment of ChemistryDepartment of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology)Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS)Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR)
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Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
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