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Effect of upright and slouch sitting postures and voluntary teeth clenching on hand grip strength in young male adults
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. King Saud Univ, Coll Appl Med Sci, Rehabil Res Chair, POB 10219, Riyadh 11433, Saudi Arabia.
2017 (English)In: Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-8127, E-ISSN 1878-6324, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 961-965Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Estimation of handgrip strength (HGS) is routinely used by clinicians and epidemiologists for objective assessment of functional status of hand and upper extremity. It is also used as an indirect indicator of overall physical strength and health status in variety of clinical situations and chronic general medical conditions. OBJECTIVE: The present study was conducted to examine the effects of upright and slouch sitting postures and voluntary teeth clenching on hand grip strength in healthy young male subjects. METHODS: One hundred healthy young males (aged 18-30 years) participated in this study. The HGS was measured using a commercially available dynamometer for the dominant hand. The HGS was measured during four test conditions; (a) slouch sitting without teeth contact, (b) slouch sitting with teeth clenching, (c) upright sitting without teeth contact, and (d) upright sitting with teeth clenching. RESULTS: The HGS values were significantly higher during slouch than upright sitting posture, both during similar and opposite teeth related conditions (p < 0.001). Teeth clenching had no effect on the in HGS values during slouch or upright sitting posture (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: As compared to upright sitting, higher HGS values can be obtained during slouch sitting in young healthy males. Teeth clenching does not affect the HGS values during slouch or upright sitting posture.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS PRESS , 2017. Vol. 30, no 5, p. 961-965
Keywords [en]
Hand grip strength (HGS), sitting posture, teeth clenching
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140939DOI: 10.3233/BMR-150278ISI: 000412063800003PubMedID: 28453449OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-140939DiVA, id: diva2:1150903
Available from: 2017-10-20 Created: 2017-10-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

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Zafar, Hamayun

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