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The worst performance rule with elderly in abnormal cognitive decline
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1473-4916
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5366-1169
2017 (English)In: Intelligence, ISSN 0160-2896, E-ISSN 1873-7935, Vol. 64, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Compared to best performances, worst performances on multi-trial psychometric tests often show stronger correlations with other g-loaded cognitive tests, which is known as the Worst Performance Rule (WPR). While worst performances may be more sensitive or specific to cognitive decline, clinical psychometric research and neuropsychological practice tends to neglect the WPR. Here, we examined the WPR-paradigm relative to abnormal cognitive decline. Specifically, we studied the WPR with binned simple reaction time task responses when rank-correlated with five different estimates of psychometric g within a memory clinic sample (n = 103) of elderly diagnosed with either Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) (n = 53) or dementia (n = 50). Three of the g-estimates were composite scores constructed from 2, 6, and 28 established test scores. Results showed a consistent WPR-pattern in the whole sample for each of the five estimates (block design rs = − 0.201 to − 0.120; digit span rs = − 0.284 to − 0.112; g2 rs = − 0.311 to − 0.162; g6 rs = − 0.314 to − 0.107; g28 rs = − 0.269 to − 0.121). Our findings contradict classical test theory, and highlight the underused potential of the WPR when assessing cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 64, p. 9-17
Keywords [en]
Aging, General intelligence, Mental chronometry, Neurodegeneration
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141418DOI: 10.1016/j.intell.2017.06.003ISI: 000412265300002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-141418DiVA, id: diva2:1154426
Available from: 2017-11-02 Created: 2017-11-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

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Wallert, JohnMadison, Guy

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