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The Effects of Unexpected and Sudden Vibrations and Sounds Does Not Disrupt Performance Similarly Over Time
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2379-9201
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Research on the effects of sudden and unexpected vibrations (i.e., deviants) have on visual tasks is scarce. Previous research has shown that vibrating deviants disrupt performance (i.e., deviance distraction) in visual digit categorization tasks in a similar manner as auditory deviants; however, this research has not used methods feasible for examining the temporal aspects of the effects. In our experiment, auditory and tactile stimuli were presented in different parts to examine the temporal aspects of deviance distraction of sounds and vibrations. Deviance distraction was found in both modalities. The effects of auditory deviants remained throughout the auditory part of the experiment whereas the effects of tactile deviants did not. Our results indicate that although deviance distraction may share similar mechanisms, the temporal aspects of deviance distraction might be dissimilar in the two modalities.

Keywords [en]
deviance distraction, cross-modal oddball, attention capture, tactile, auditory
National Category
Psychology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141859OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-141859DiVA, id: diva2:1156768
Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09
In thesis
1. Attention capture by sudden and unexpected changes: a multisensory perspective
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attention capture by sudden and unexpected changes: a multisensory perspective
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The main focus for this thesis was cross-modal attention capture by sudden and unexpected sounds and vibrations, known as deviants, presented in a stream the same to-be-ignored stimulus. More specifically, the thesis takes a multisensory perspective and examines the possible similarities and differences in how deviant vibrations and sounds affect visual task performance (Study I), and whether the deviant and standard stimuli have to be presented within the same modality to capture attention away from visual tasks (Study II). Furthermore, by presenting spatial deviants (changing the source of the stimuli from one side of the body to the other) in audiotactile (bimodal), tactile, and auditory to-be-ignored, it explores whether bimodal stimuli are more salient compared to unimodal (Study III). In addition, Study III tested the claims that short-term memory is domain-specific.

In line with previous research, Study I found that both auditory and tactile deviants captured attention away from the visual task. However, the temporal dynamics between the two modalities seem to differ. That is, it seems like practice causes the effect of vibratory deviants to reduce, whereas this is not the case for auditory deviants. This suggests that there are central mechanisms (detection of the change) and sensory-specific mechanisms.

Study II found that the deviant and standard stimuli must be presented within the same modality. If attention capture by deviants is produced by a mismatch within a neural model predicting upcoming stimuli, the neural model is likely built on stimuli within each modality separately.

The results of Study III revealed that spatial and verbal short-term memory are negatively affected by a spatial change in to-be-ignored sequences, but only when the change is within a bimodal sequence. These results can be taken as evidence for a unitary account of short-term memory (verbal and spatial information stored in the same storage) and that bimodal stimuli may be integrated into a unitary percept that make any change in the stream more salient. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2017. p. 46
Keywords
Attention Capture, Tactile, Auditory, Visual, Crossmodal, Bimodal, Distraction, Short-term memory, Attention
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141852 (URN)978-91-7601-803-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-12-08, Hörsal B, Samhällsvetarhuset, Umeå, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-11-17 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

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Marsja, ErikNeely, GregoryLjungberg, Jessica K.

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