umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Differences in symptoms, first medical contact and pre-hospital delay times between patients with ST- and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: European heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care., ISSN 2048-8726Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Abstract

Aim:

In ST-elevation myocardial infarction, time to reperfusion is crucial for the prognosis. Symptom presentation in myocardial infarction influences pre-hospital delay times but studies about differences in symptoms between patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction are sparse and inconclusive. The aim was to compare symptoms, first medical contact and pre-hospital delay times in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

Methods and results:

This multicentre, observational study included 694 myocardial infarction patients from five hospitals. The patients filled in a questionnaire about their pre-hospital experiences within 24 h of hospital admittance. Chest pain was the most common symptom in ST-elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (88.7 vs 87.0%, p=0.56). Patients with cold sweat (odds ratio 3.61, 95% confidence interval 2.29–5.70), jaw pain (odds ratio 2.41, 95% confidence interval 1.04–5.58), and nausea (odds ratio 1.70, 95% confidence interval 1.01–2.87) were more likely to present with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, whereas the opposite was true for symptoms that come and go (odds ratio 0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.90) or anxiety (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.29–0.92). Use of emergency medical services was higher among patients admitted with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. The pre-hospital delay time from symptom onset to first medical contact was significantly longer in non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (2:05 h vs 1:10 h, p=0.001).

Conclusion:

Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction differed from those with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction regarding symptom presentation, ambulance utilisation and pre-hospital delay times. This knowledge is important to be aware of for all healthcare personnel and the general public especially in order to recognise symptoms suggestive of ST-elevation myocardial infarction and when to decide if there is a need for an ambulance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keywords [en]
Myocardial infarction, symptoms, care seeking, prehospital delay, ST-elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction, first medical contact
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142366DOI: 10.1177/2048872617741734OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-142366DiVA, id: diva2:1160889
Available from: 2017-11-28 Created: 2017-11-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Hellström Ängerud, Karin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hellström Ängerud, Karin
By organisation
Department of Nursing
In the same journal
European heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care.
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 14 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf