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Understanding the Simber Effect: why is the age-dependent increase in children's cognitive ability smaller in Arab countries than in Britain?
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2018 (English)In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 122, p. 38-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research indicates that the typical increase in IQ during childhood is greater in European countries than in Arab countries. A systematic literature review of age-dependent IQ in Arab countries is conducted, yielding relevant studies for 12 countries that fulfil the inclusion criteria. In almost all of these studies, Arab children exhibit an age-dependent IQ decline relative to Caucasian children, from 5 to about 12 years of age in particular. We term this phenomenon the Simber Effect. We propose two non-exclusive explanations. (1) The Flynn Effect is less intense in Arab countries because of localised differences, including poorer education quality and greater religiosity. (2) Those from Arab countries follow a faster Life History Strategy than Europeans, for environmental and possibly genetic reasons. Either way, the Simber Effect may amount to a Wilson Effect, meaning that the impact of genetic IQ increases with age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 122, p. 38-42
Keywords [en]
Flynn effect, Life history theory, Arabic, IQ, Intelligence
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142889DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2017.10.002ISI: 000417774900007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-142889DiVA, id: diva2:1165303
Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

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Madison, Guy

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