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Socioeconomic inequalities and hazardous drinking in Northern Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background: Socioeconomic inequalities in alcohol consumption have been well documented in several different countries. However, little is known about prevalence of hazardous drinking in Northern Sweden in relation to all three components of socioeconomic status: education, occupation, and income. The aim of this study is to explore the association between socioeconomic status and hazardous alcohol consumption and to measure the impact of socioeconomic inequalities on hazardous drinking patterns in Northern Sweden.

Methods: A cross-sectional study using data from the Swedish National Public Health Survey conducted in 2014. The sample included 25,667 people (50% response rate) between 16-84 years from the four northern counties of Sweden. Hazardous alcohol consumption was measured using AUDIT-C, a short version of the World Health Organisation’s Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Education, occupation and income were used as determinants of socioeconomic status. Log-binomial regression was used to assess the association between socioeconomic status and hazardous drinking. Relative index of inequalities and slope index of inequality were used to measure the magnitude of socioeconomic inequalities in alcohol consumption.

Results: Independent of the occupational level, amount of disposable income, gender, age, and marital status, educational attainment was inversely associated with hazardous drinking (low educational level had PR=1.61 and the medium level PR=1.46). Occupation and income were not significant predictors of hazardous drinking. The relative educational inequality showed that the low-educated group of people had an increased risk of hazardous drinking compared to the high-educated group (RII=1.62), while the absolute educational inequality was not significant. Income inequality was not significant in neither relative nor absolute terms.

Conclusion: The results suggest that educational attainment has a significant effect on hazardous alcohol consumption while occupation and income do not play a significant role in hazardous drinking behavior. Furthermore, relative educational inequality in hazardous drinking is present in Northern Sweden, while income inequality does not have a significant impact on hazardous drinking behavior. Since the present study demonstrates that higher education predicts lower prevalence of hazardous drinking policy makers could consider focusing more attention towards education among young people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , p. 23
Series
Centre for Public Health Report Series, ISSN 1651-341X ; 2017:40
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143201OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-143201DiVA, id: diva2:1167599
External cooperation
Hälsa på lika villkor (Västernorrlands, Jämtlands, Västerbottens och Norrbottens läns landsting), Folkhälsomyndigheten
Educational program
Master's Programme in Public Health
Presentation
2017-05-22, Room A, 9th floor, dentistry building, Norrlands University Hospital, Umeå, 13:00 (English)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf