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Is high social class always beneficial for survival?: Northern Sweden 1801–2013
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2865-7894
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Focusing on two regions in northern Sweden 1801–2013, we challenge common notions of the assumed advantage in survival of belonging to a high social class. The issue is analysed according to gender and age group (adults and elderly) and in relation to the developmentof economic inequality. The results show that high social class is not always favourable for survival. Men in the elite category had higher mortality compared to others during a large part of the studied period; a male mortality class reversal appears at a surprisingly late date, while the social gradient among women conforms to the expected pattern. Wesuggest that health-related behaviour is decisive not only in later but earlier phases of the mortality transition as well. The results implicate that the association between social class and health is more complex than is assumed in many of the dominant theories in demography and epidemiology.

Keywords [en]
Adult mortality, old age mortality, social inequality, northern Sweden
National Category
History Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Historical Demography; Population studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143961OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-143961DiVA, id: diva2:1174011
Projects
Ageing and Living ConditionsOld age, health and inequality: Mortality from a life course perspective in Sweden 1986–2009
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2012-892Swedish Research Council, 349-2008-6592Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

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Edvinsson, SörenBroström, Göran

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf