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The effects of hydropeaking on riverine plants: a review
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
2018 (English)In: Biological Reviews, ISSN 1464-7931, E-ISSN 1469-185X, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 658-673Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hydropeaking refers to frequent, rapid and short-term fluctuations in water flow and water levels downstream and upstream of hydropower stations. Such fluctuations are becoming increasingly common worldwide and are known to have far-reaching effects on riverine vegetation. Novel hydrology caused by hydropeaking has no natural correspondence in freshwater systems, and hence few species have adaptations to all its aspects. Here, we review the literature on hydropeaking effects on riverine plants and define the state of the information on this human alteration of riverine ecosystems. We focus on riparian plants, but also draw on information from aquatic plant species, which exhibit a wide variety of adaptations to inundation and associated processes. Riparian plants face both physiological and physical constraints because of the shifts between submergence and drainage, and erosion of substrates. At the population level, hydropeaking may favour dispersal within, but not between, reservoirs, but may hamper germination, establishment, growth and reproduction. At the community level, strong filtering towards easily dispersed, flexible, flood-tolerant and amphibious plants is expected, although few species share these traits. Hence, most riparian plant species are expected to disappear or be pushed towards the upper boundaries of the regulated river margin. Future research should examine more closely global variation in hydropeaking effects, including other taxonomic groups of species and the diversity of hydropeaking regimes. There is also a need for studies focusing on identifying the boundaries within which hydropeaking could operate without impairing plant life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2018. Vol. 93, no 1, p. 658-673
Keywords [en]
catchment management, environmental flows, hydropeaking, hydropower, plant communities, plant nctional traits, riparian vegetation, riverine vegetation
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144338DOI: 10.1111/brv.12362ISI: 000419965700033PubMedID: 28815925OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-144338DiVA, id: diva2:1181459
Available from: 2018-02-08 Created: 2018-02-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

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Bejarano, Maria D.Jansson, RolandNilsson, Christer

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