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The metabolic syndrome, inflammation and colorectal cancer risk: an evaluation of large panels of plasma protein markers using repeated, pre-diagnostic samples
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8540-6891
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9692-101x
2017 (English)In: Mediators of Inflammation, article id 4803156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a set of metabolic risk factors including obesity, dysglycemia, and dyslipidemia, is associated with increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. A putative biological mechanism is chronic, low-grade inflammation, both a feature of MetS and a CRC risk factor. However, excess body fat also induces a proinflammatory state and increases CRC risk. In order to explore the relationship between MetS, body size, inflammation, and CRC, we studied large panels of inflammatory and cancer biomarkers. We included 138 participants from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme with repeated sampling occasions, 10 years apart. Plasma samples were analyzed for 178 protein markers by proximity extension assay. To identify associations between plasma protein levels and MetS components, linear mixed models were fitted for each protein. Twelve proteins were associated with at least one MetS component, six of which were associated with MetS score. MetS alone was not related to any protein. Instead, BMI displayed by far the strongest associations with the biomarkers. One of the 12 MetS score-related proteins (FGF-21), also associated with BMI, was associated with an increased CRC risk (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.19–2.47). We conclude that overweight and obesity, acting through both inflammation and other mechanisms, likely explain the MetS-CRC connection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2017. article id 4803156
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134167DOI: 10.1155/2017/4803156OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-134167DiVA, id: diva2:1183702
Funder
Swedish Society of MedicineSwedish Cancer SocietyVästerbotten County CouncilAvailable from: 2018-02-19 Created: 2018-02-19 Last updated: 2018-10-15Bibliographically approved

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Harlid, S.Myte, Robinvan Guelpen, Bethany

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