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Asthma and COPD overlap (ACO) is related to a high burden of sleep disturbance and respiratory symptoms: results from the RHINE and Swedish GA2LEN surveys
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0195055Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The term Asthma and COPD Overlap (ACO) describes a condition where asthma and COPD overlap. We aimed to investigate associations between ACO and insomnia and respiratory symptoms, and to investigate the prevalence of ACO and the characteristics of subjects with ACO in two Northern European population studies.

Methods: The study comprised 25 429 subjects aged ≥ 40 years who participated in one of two Northern European general population surveys. Both surveys included questions on asthma, COPD, respiratory and sleep-related symptoms, including difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early-morning awakening, and excessive daytime sleepiness. ACO was defined as having both self-reported asthma and COPD.

Results: The prevalence of ACO was 1.0%. The group with ACO had a higher prevalence of both insomnia and respiratory symptoms than subjects with only asthma or COPD. Having ACO was independently associated with a 2-3 times higher probability of having sleep-related symptoms as compared with the group without asthma or COPD, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, smoking history and educational level (adjusted odds ratio 2.14-3.36, 95% CI).

Conclusion: Subjects with ACO have a high prevalence of insomnia and respiratory symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the association between sleep-related symptoms and ACO.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science , 2018. Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0195055
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
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URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146281DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0195055ISI: 000428988800023PubMedID: 29608582OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-146281DiVA, id: diva2:1194681
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved

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Forsberg, BertilFranklin, Karl A.

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