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Longitudinal relationships among depressive symptoms, cortisol, and brain atrophy in the neocortex and the hippocampus
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
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2018 (English)In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-690X, E-ISSN 1600-0447, Vol. 167, no 6, p. 491-502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Depression is associated with accelerated aging and age-related diseases. However, mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear. The aim of this study was to longitudinally assess the link between depressive symptoms, brain atrophy, and cortisol levels.

METHOD: Participants from the Betula prospective cohort study (mean age = 59 years, SD = 13.4 years) underwent clinical, neuropsychological and brain 3T MRI assessments at baseline and a 4-year follow-up. Cortisol levels were measured at baseline in four saliva samples. Cortical and hippocampal atrophy rates were estimated and compared between participants with and without depressive symptoms (n = 81) and correlated with cortisol levels (n = 49).

RESULTS: Atrophy in the left superior frontal gyrus and right lingual gyrus developed in parallel with depressive symptoms, and in the left temporal pole, superior temporal cortex, and supramarginal cortex after the onset of depressive symptom. Depression-related atrophy was significantly associated with elevated cortisol levels. Elevated cortisol levels were also associated with widespread prefrontal, parietal, lateral, and medial temporal atrophy.

CONCLUSION: Depressive symptoms and elevated cortisol levels are associated with atrophy of the prefrontal and limbic areas of the brain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018. Vol. 167, no 6, p. 491-502
Keywords [en]
depressive symptomatology, neuroimaging, superior temporal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, MRI
National Category
Nursing Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146479DOI: 10.1111/acps.12860ISI: 000433560700006PubMedID: 29457245OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-146479DiVA, id: diva2:1196604
Available from: 2018-04-10 Created: 2018-04-10 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved

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Sundström, AnnaLindgren, LenitaStomby, AndreasOlsson, TommyNyberg, Lars

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Sundström, AnnaLindgren, LenitaStomby, AndreasOlsson, TommyNyberg, Lars
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Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR)Department of PsychologyDepartment of NursingUmeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI)Department of Public Health and Clinical MedicineDiagnostic RadiologyPhysiology
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Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica
NursingPsychiatry

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