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Particulate and gaseous emissions from charcoal combustion in barbecue grills
Centre of Environmental and Marine Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4279-3569
Centre of Environmental and Marine Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6319-0265
Centre of Environmental and Marine Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5775-7085
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Centre of Environmental and Marine Studies. (Thermochemical Energy Conversion Laboratory)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6521-4160
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2018 (English)In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 176, p. 296-306Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of charcoal for cooking and heating can be a major source of air pollution and lead to a wide range of health outcomes. The aim of this study was to experimentally quantify and characterise the gaseous and particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions from charcoal combustion in a typical brick barbecue grill. The gaseous emission factors were 219 ± 44.8 g kg−1 for carbon monoxide (CO), 3.01 ± 0.698 g kg−1 for nitrogen oxides (NOxexpressed as NO2), and 4.33 ± 1.53 gC kg−1 for total organic carbon (TOC). Particle emissions (7.38 ± 0.353 g kg−1 of dry charcoal burned) were of the same order of magnitude as those from traditional residential wood burning appliances. About 50% of the PM2.5 emitted had a carbonaceous nature while water soluble ions accounted, on average, for 17% of the particulate mass. Alkanes (C11–C16 and C23), hopanes, steranes and alkyl-PAHs accounted for small mass fractions of PM2.5. Phenolic compounds and saccharides represented the major particle-bond organic constituents. The high proportion of either resin acids or syringyl and vanillyl compounds is consistent with emissions from charred coniferous wood. The ratios between anhydrosugars for charcoal are much lower than the values reported for lignite combustion, but overlap those from other biomass burning sources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 176, p. 296-306
Keywords [en]
Barbecue grill, Charcoal, Emissions, Chemical composition, PM2.5, Organic markers
National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
biology, Environmental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147244DOI: 10.1016/j.fuproc.2018.03.004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-147244DiVA, id: diva2:1202675
Available from: 2018-04-29 Created: 2018-04-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

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Vicente, Estela D.Vicente, AnaEvtyugina, MargaritaCarvalho, RicardoTarelho, Luís A. C.Oduber, Fernanda I.Alves, Célia

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Vicente, Estela D.Vicente, AnaEvtyugina, MargaritaCarvalho, RicardoTarelho, Luís A. C.Oduber, Fernanda I.Alves, Célia
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Department of Applied Physics and Electronics
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Fuel processing technology
Energy Systems

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