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How landscape organization and scale shape catchment hydrology and biogeochemistry: insights from a long-term catchment study
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
2018 (English)In: WIREs Water, ISSN 0935-879X, E-ISSN 2049-1948, Vol. 5, no 2, article id e1265Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Catchment science plays a critical role in the protection of water resources in the face of ongoing changes in climate, long-range transport of air pollutants, and land use. Addressing these challenges, however, requires improved understanding of how, when, and where changes in water quantity and quality occur within river networks. To reach these goals, we must recognize how different catchment features are organized to regulate surface chemistry at multiple scales, from processes controlling headwaters, to the downstream mixing of water from multiple landscape sources and deep aquifers. Here we synthesize 30-years of hydrological and biogeochemical research from the Krycklan catchment study (KCS) in northern Sweden to demonstrate the benefits of coupling long-term monitoring with multi-scale research to advance our understanding of catchment functioning across space and time. We show that the regulation of hydrological and biogeochemical patterns in the KCS can be decomposed into four, hierarchically structured landscape features that include: (1) transmissivity and reactivity of dominant source layers within riparian soils, (2) spatial arrangement of groundwater input zones that govern water and solute fluxes at reach- to segment-scales, (3) landscape scale heterogeneity (forests, mires, and lakes) that generates unique biogeochemical signals downstream, and (4) broad-scale mixing of surface streams with deep groundwater contributions. While this set of features are perhaps specific to the study region, analogous hierarchical controls are likely to be widespread. Resolving these scale dependent processes is important for predicting how, when, and where different environmental changes may influence patterns of surface water chemistry within river networks. (C) 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018. Vol. 5, no 2, article id e1265
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
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URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146152DOI: 10.1002/wat2.1265ISI: 000425438800001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-146152DiVA, id: diva2:1203568
Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

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Sponseller, Ryan A.

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